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Mowed vs. mown - Grammarist
In a businesslike manner they have mowed through the schedule, losing just four times in 35 games from the end of November through Wednesday night. [CBC] The vehicle had been travelling north and came to rest on a mown stretch of grass on the side of the road facing Proserpine. [Mackay Daily Mercury ...
Mow | Define Mow at Dictionary.com
Mow definition, to cut down (grass, grain, etc.) with a scythe or a machine. See more.
Mowed - definition of mowed by The Free Dictionary
Define mowed. mowed synonyms, mowed pronunciation, mowed translation, English dictionary definition of mowed. n. 1. The place in a barn where hay, grain, or other feed is stored.
Mow | Definition of Mow by Merriam-Webster
Define mow: a piled-up stack (as of hay or fodder); also : a pile of hay or grain in a barn — mow in a sentence
A swastika was mowed into a field. Was it part of a chain ...
Neighbors said the display of hate in a Lorton, Va., community was as large as it was shocking: a swastika roughly 40 feet across mowed into the grass of a community field. Tire marks from a riding mower ran from the lot and up a road to the home of a teen who was known as troubled in the ...
Urban Dictionary: mowed
Mowed, pronounced so it sounds like loud. To devour, to eat a alrge quantity of food quickly.
Virginia teen charged in death of girlfriend's parents ...
A Virginia teen charged in the shooting deaths of his girlfriend’s parents mowed a swastika about 40 feet across into the grass of a community field, according to neighbors.
What does mowed mean? - definitions.net
Definition of mowed in the Definitions.net dictionary. Meaning of mowed. What does mowed mean? Information and translations of mowed in the most comprehensive dictionary definitions resource on the web.
Mown | Define Mown at Dictionary.com
Mown definition, a past participle of mow1 . See more.
Mower - Wikipedia
A mower is a person or machine that cuts (mows) grass or other plants that grow on the ground. Usually mowing is distinguished from reaping, which uses similar implements, but is the traditional term for harvesting grain crops, e.g. with reapers and combines.